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Welcome to Accordionville!!

Repairing the Guerrini 1924 Antique Accordion

Today we will start repairing the 1924 year San Francisco Guerrini Accordion.

We will take out the frozen treble keyboard spindle and eventually replace it with a new one.

Inside the accordion we see the dates stamped on the treble and bass blocks.

Inside the accordion we see the dates stamped on the treble and bass blocks.

Inside the accordion we see the dates stamped on the treble and bass blocks.

Name of owner had been removed and replaced by black strip

Name of previous owner had been removed and replaced by black strip. No idea who. Email me if you know.

The Grille showing the familiar American Eagle logo and Guerrini Co. San Francisco

The Grille showing the familiar American Eagle logo and "Guerrini Co. San Francisco"

Bagpipe decorations

Bagpipe decorations on antique accordion

Bass collapse to be repaired

Bass side showing buttons collapse due to rough handling of shipment, to be repaired.

Partially resassembled bass machine in back of antique 1924 Guerrini Accordion

Partially resassembled bass machine in back of 1924 Guerrini Accordion

The Keyboard spindle has been pushed out the left side and drill chuck attached.

The Keyboard spindle has been pushed out the left side and drill chuck attached.

The first keys come out of 1924 Guerrini Accordion.

The first keys come out of 1924 Guerrini Accordion.

We make sure the numbers on the keys are readable.

We make sure the numbers on the keys are readable

The aluminum plate is very dirty and pads too.

The aluminum plate is very dirty and treble key valve pads too.

A piece broke out of the black walnut key bed.

A piece broke out of the black walnut key bed.

We glue the piece of wood back carefully.

Putting the piece back using Weldbond[R]Glue

Carefully numbered keys, after we took apart the accordion keyboard

Carefully numbered keys, after we took apart the accordion keyboard
Some tools shown: Drill chuck, Small punch, Wire nail made into a punch, End-nipper pliers, Hammer, Soldering iron.

Here is the procedure for getting out the "frozen" key spindle.

First off, we tried getting a grip on it with end-nipper pliers. We got a grip, but we could not rotate the spindle more than 180 degrees without risking twisting it in half. We then tried applying heat on the exposed end, to loosen it in the keys, which had swelled alightly due to humidity. That did not work, and after twisting it forcibly a few times, the pliers wore off a piece from the end of it.

We then bored a hole in the opposite end of the key bed, measuring that side's location based on the other end location. Probing for the end of the spindle, we used a hammer and a small diameter punch to press the spindle either way until we settled on bringing it out the left side. After about 3/4" was exposed, a drill chuck was attached and we rotated the spindle while pulling it, all-in-all a delicate operation since the keys were binding it.

Next...

We will post more pictures of repairing the keyboard and valves, plus eventually, the complete restoration of this antique Guerrini accordion.

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